NAEP Assessment

View Rhode Island’s Progress on NAEP in Math and Reading:

NAEP – Reading Scores RI 2015 Grade 8 – From the report: “The percentage of students in Rhode Island who performed at or above the NAEP Proficient level was 35 percent in 2015. This percentage was not significantly different from that in 2013 (36 percent) and in 1998 (32 percent)

NAEP 2015 Reading Scores RI – Grade 4 – From the report: “The percentage of students in Rhode Island who performed at or above the NAEP Proficient level was 40 percent in 2015. This percentage was not significantly different from that in 2013 (38 percent) and was greater than that in 1998 (31 percent).”

NAEP – 2015 – Math RI Grade 8 – From the report – “The percentage of students in Rhode Island who performed at or above the NAEP Proficient level was 35 percent in 2015. This percentage was not significantly different from that in 2013 (36 percent) and in 1998 (32 percent)

NAEP – 2015 RI Math Grade 4  From the report- “The percentage of students in Rhode Island who performed at or abovethe NAEP Proficient level was 37 percent in 2015. This percentage was smaller than that in 2013 (42 percent) and was greater than that in 2000 (22 percent).

There is no one test that can accurately measure student learning and achievement, but that said, NAEP is widely agreed on to be the nation’s report card for Math and English. Part of the rationale for Common Core was to address low NAEP scores. While there has been some growth, Rhode Island’s overall proficiency levels in 2015 are not substantially different than they were in 1998 – still less than 50 percent of all students testing as proficient.

The bottom line is that the Common Core standards themselves are inherently flawed – if they weren’t, we’d see NAEP data steadily increasing nationally since it also measures numeracy and literacy. We are not serving our students well with Common Core Standards.

Parents should be outraged that we haven’t moved the needle in proficiency in any significant manner on NAEP 17 years – that’s more than an entire academic career! Parents need to get involved and demand more from their districts and from RIDE. The state needs to rethink participation in the Common Core Standards and the methods we use to measure student learning. Our state’s participation in the PARCC consortium is taking us further down the rabbit hole of Common Core standards and we need to develop standards and measures that address genuine student learning, not just how to perform well on a test.

We’ll get PARCC scores in a few weeks and we’ll hear from RIDE that this is a baseline year and not to worry. There are real kids in real classrooms struggling under these policies while administrators try to figure out what to do. Parents are the ones left trying to help kids deal with the inappropriate standards, and decreasing recess times and kids are understandably frustrated.

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